Natural Solutions for Menopause Symptoms

Topics: Wellness and Health
Brown flax seed

If you are a woman currently experiencing symptoms of menopause, you should know that there are natural ways to help alleviate them. Here, I’ll introduce you to two options: one that is dietary–flaxseed–and the other that is supplement-based–black cohosh.

Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum)
While research results are mixed around flaxseed and its ability to reduce menopausal symptoms, there are enough positive findings to support use of this nutrient-rich herb. For many women, it has made the difference between comfort and discomfort when it comes to reduction of hot flashes, night sweats, and mood swings. There are three nutrients unique to flaxseed, all of which play a role in supporting good health.

1. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: beneficial for preventing or treating certain health conditions, including heart disease and depression.

2. Mucilage: refers to water-soluble, gel-forming fiber that can provide special support to the intestinal tract. This makes flaxseed an excellent support to digestion and relief of constipation.

3. Lignans: provides fiber-related polyphenols that have two important health benefits. They provide antioxidants, which help prevent damage to other cells in the body and are associated with preventing disease. Additionally, polyphenols in lignans influence hormone metabolism.

Purchasing and Storing Flax
Raw flaxseed ranges in color from amber/gold to tan/brown. White or green flaxseed has been harvested before full maturity; black flaxseeds were likely harvested after full maturity. To reap the full health benefits, select the amber or brown variety. If possible, purchase the whole seed in bulk, store in the freezer and grind only the amount needed for immediate use. Flaxseed can be ground, sprinkled on cereal, added to baking mixes and used as a thickening agent in many recipes.

Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa)
There’s a long history to the medical uses of Black Cohosh. Native Americans have used it as a diuretic and to treat fatigue. European settlers used preparations of the roots to treat fever, menstrual problems, and pain following childbirth. Into the 19th century, black cohosh became a staple ingredient in medicines for “women’s complaints.” Over time, it faded from use in the U.S. while still being used in Europe. New studies in the U.S., however, are investigating the safety and long-term effectiveness of black cohosh and there’s an almost mainstream resurgence of its use for treatment of women’s health concerns.

Black cohosh is considered a menopause tonic for a number of reasons. It can improve mood and soothe anxiety. Also, herbal practitioners recommend it for taming hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal dryness. It’s commonly prescribed for women who – for medical reasons – don’t take conventional hormone replacement therapy.

Tinctures, capsules and standardized extract are available for medicinal use. The specific dose of this herb will depend on your individual needs and health concerns. Black Cohosh should not be used during pregnancy or nursing. It is not recommended for persons who have a heart condition or liver disease. Always check with your holistic health practitioner before using an herbal remedy.